Oil-resistant vs. Slip-resistant

Oil-resistant vs. Slip-resistant

More often than not, when shoe manufacturers or people, in general, discuss slip resistant shoes and oil resistant shoes, they are talking about the same thing; however, they are sort of different in sort of different ways.

Are you confused yet?

Generally speaking, when shoes are deemed slip resistant, we are saying that the shoe itself meets certain requirements that, when put under testing at various levels, they are less likely to slip than other shoes that were not tested under various levels.

Slip-resistant Shoe Features

These testing levels generally include wet, slippery, and oily situations. So, when we talk about slip resistant shoes, in so long as those shoes were tested under mainstream testing guidelines then those shoes would have been tested in wet, slippery, and oily situations.

So, in that sense, those non-slip shoes are also oil resistant. In short, most non-slip shoes are tested against oil and so are not only slip-resistant, but also could be deemed oil resistant.

In short, most non-slip shoes are tested against oil and so are not only slip-resistant, but also could be deemed oil resistant.

Oil-resistant Shoe Features

However, something important to note is that oil resistant shoes can also be attributed to the upper part of the shoe. What I mean is, some shoes will become absolutely destroyed by oil. The petroleum like substance will gradually eat away at the shoes material.

So, regardless if they are slipping all over the place or not, if the upper material is non oil resistant, then that shoe will degrade itself rather quickly over time when exposed to various elements of oil.

That means that if you find yourself good pairs of oil resistant shoes, where oil resistant means the upper part, then those shoes will last longer when exposed to such chemicals.

If you want to know what the ?oil resistant? part of shoe marketing means, then you would simply want to know if the shoes outsole are oil resistant or if the quarter (or other) part of the shoe is oil resistant.

If the shoe’s outsole is oil resistant, then that simply means they are tested to be nonslip or slip resistant. If the quarter (or other) part of the shoe is oil resistant, then that means that the upper part of the shoe will last longer when exposed to oily substances.

Example of Oil-resistant Non-slip Shoe

Take, for example, the Keen Utility Men?s PTC Oxford Work Shoe. It is listed as being both non-slip and oil resistant. However, you must take note that the non-slip and oil resistance only applies to the outsole, not any other part of the shoe.

This means that, while the shoe works well in slippery or oily environments, the upper part of the shoe may be more susceptible to oil damage.

Summary of Oil-resistant vs. Slip-resistant

In short, oil resistant and slip resistant are generally referring to the outsoles of the shoe which is the part of the shoe that comes in contact with the ground. However, it must be noted that oil resistant SOMETIMES refers to the ability of the rest of the shoe to hold up longer in constant exposure to oil itself.

Here’s an easy way to remember: oil resistant and slip resistant are generally referring to the outsoles of the shoe which is the part of the shoe that comes in contact with the ground.

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